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John Crowley Little and Big

Name:
John Crowley
Website:
http://littlebig25.com
Interests: (32)
1960s, aimee bender, american catholicism, ben katchor, byron, contemporary fiction, early flight, edward gordon craig, fairies, fantasy fiction, g.k. chesterton, gnosticism, jim crace, john banville, john crowley, john webster, krazy kat, literary events, little nemo, marlowe, nabokov, narratology, renaissance magic, robert louis stevenson, science fiction, secrets, shakespeare, walt kelly, winsor mccay, writing, writing workshops, wwii homefront
Bio
John Crowley is the author of nine novels and two collections of short fiction. His first published novels were science fiction: The Deep (1975) and Beasts (1976). Engine Summer appeared in 1977 and was nominated for The American Book Award; it appears in David Pringle’s authoritative 100 Best Science Fiction Novels. In 1980 came Little, Big, which won the World Fantasy Award for Best Novel and which Ursula LeGuin described as a book which “all by itself calls for a redefinition of fantasy.” In 1980 Crowley embarked on an ambitious multi-volume novel called Aegypt, of which three volumes have been published – Aegypt, Love & Sleep, and Daemonomania; the final volume is in preparation. This series and Little, Big were cited when Crowley received the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Letters Award for Literature. (He is also the recipient of an Ingram Merrill Foundation grant.) His recent novels are The Translator, recipient of the Premio Flaianno (Italy), and Lord Byron’s Novel: The Evening Land, which contains an entire imaginary novel by the poet.

Crowley’s short fiction is collected in three volumes: Novelty (containing the World Fantasy Award-winning novella Great Work of Time), Antiquities, and Novelties & Souvenirs, an omnibus volume containing almost all his short fiction (a new novella, The Girlhood of Shakespeare’s Heroines, will appear in 2005). A volume of essays and criticism will appear in 2006.

For much of his working life, Crowley has also worked in films and television, writing scripts for short films and documentaries, many historical documentaries for Public Television; his work has received numerous awards and has been shown at the New York Film Festival, the Berlin Film Festival, and many others. His scripts include The World of Tomorrow (the 1939 World’s Fair), No Place to Hide (the bomb shelter obsession), The Hindenburg, and FIT: Episodes in the History of the Body (American fitness practices and beliefs over the decades; with Laurie Block).
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