March 18th, 2006

baby

(no subject)


ME

The Crow has long been my totem animal. No particular reason, The Crow has long been my totem animal. No particular reason, except homophonics; my name aThe Crow has long been my totem animal. No particular reason, except homophonics; my name actrually had no crow in it. There are two distinct nThe Crow has long been my totem animal. No particular reason, except homophonics; my name actrually had no crow in it. There are two distinct names, an Irish Crowley and an English Crowley. The English name is a variant of Crowleigh, or "field of crows". The Irish name is a nice pot opf vowels and inappropriate consonants: O'Cruadhlaoich. It translates as "hard hero". The two names come together because the English colonial power assigned the English name to the Irish one as being easier to say and more familiar. This linguistic act is called a hobson-jobson, meaning the assigning of a word in one language to stand for a word in another. Another examnple in British colonial practice is the word "compound" meaning a fenced or walled in area: the assignment of the English word to the Malayan word kampong is a hobson-jobson.

LITTLE, BIG

I've written ten or twelve books, but the one that jas pleased the most people is Little, Big, a fairy tale (sort of).  It currently exists as a HarperCollins paperback but it is on the road to appearing in a splendid illustrated fine-press edition from a small (actually minute, but never mind) press called Incunabula.

As I've stated on the site http://littlebig25.com/

"Every author dreams that his work will be afforded all the care in editing, design, and production that he would give it himself, if he could. That (usually futile) dream was fulfilled for me when Incunabula published a collection of my stories called Antiquities, a marvellous (and now quite valuable) volume. So I'm delighted that publisher Ron Drummond and designer John Berry have joined up again in a new project on my behalf — a splendid new edition of Little, Big on its 25th anniversary. The project has my full and enthusiastic support, and I will be working with them on every aspect of the publication. What a treat! I hope you will think so too."

The catch is that the book can't be published until a certain number of subscriptions has been reached.  So  if you want one, you have to sign up soon, to help push the number up.  (If the publisher never makes it -- but lety's don't think about that -- everybody gets their money back).

AND

I've never blogged, on-line-journalled, or emailed before (well yes of course I've emailed,  some days nothing else, but the rest is true) so I don't know what I'll put up here or why anyone might be interested, but I'll see.  I'm a very poor typist (unlike my children , who can type faster than they can talk -- a computer scientist I was talking to expects the end of the keyboard in the near future, to be replaced by what?  I can't use dictation software though I'd love to:  too much of  a sentence guy, and not a Henry James.)

So that's the um plan.
baby

(no subject)

So excuse the strange repetitions in the first entries.  I had just begun on my logging.  It's actually very odd to me to think of writing off into the ether -- hard to believe that anyone would find or read what I've written amid the billion pages they might be looking at instead.  I suppose I've begun this without a circle of friends who would want or need to look at it, though I can imagine several friends who would find it a very useful way to be sociable and keep in touch.