July 15th, 2006

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Endlessness

Writing the foregoing (though of course in LJ format the foregoing is below the aftergoing, strangely for a printed-page guy) I was reminded of the day the first printed copy of the first volume (which will now get its proper name in the whole, which is The Solitudes) arrived at my house.  It was February 1987.  My children were being born in a Boston hospital.  When I got home (they and their mother had to remain there a while) there was the book, delivered perhaps on the same day though by a different bird.  So now they are to be 20 years old in the same year the last volume appears.
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A picture taken by Jen Shyu of the reading at Koffee on Audubon. Liz Hand and  Jen Shyu with homeless man who wandered in -- you know the kind at readings.  The crowds had already left.
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Discussing with I forget just whom at Readercon (Paul Park?) a certain kind of metaphor or catch phrase that loses its metaphoric explanatory power as the technology moves on.  An example is "went on nagging like a broken record."  There must be millions now alive who have never heard the distinctive repetitions of a broken record, and yet they use the phrase anyway.  A related one is "flip side"  -- doesn't this mean the other side of a record with one song on it?  The A side was the better one (usually).  No such thing now in the world, and yet everyone knows what the flip side is -- the possibly negative or less charming aspect of something.

One more:  the phrase "This is where I came in," meaning this conversation or situation has now grown obviously repetitive and looks to go on being so, and I will leave.  The phrase comes from movies (the kind shown in theaters on screens) and how it used to be that the theaters were open all the time and you just got the idea to go and went in and sat down and started watching whatever it was, and pretty soon got the vague drift, and watched to the end, then the cartoon, the newsreel, the second feature, and then the start of the movie you at first walked in on, until the point came where you recognized what was going on, at which point you said "This is where I came in," and left.  You can still use the phrase in its metaphoric or transferred sense even if you are ignorant of its source.

Some are so old they are used for antique flavoring -- "keep your powder dry," etc.  But  "a good head of steam?"  "Tit caught in the wringer?"
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News on LB25

Th e Little, Big 25th Anniversary Edition website accessible from this page has some news, cast in the form of a press release from the publisher -- top link on the home page.  Interested parties, might-be-interested parites, and subscribers should go check it out.  A couple of parameters of the arrangement have changed, hopes are rising (it seems) and -- and -- I feel just a little uncomfortable using my Live Journal and Friends to sell my books -- one or another of them -- but then again I allow myself to tell myslef (and convince myself) that I have actually done good to anyone I have induced to read or have my work -- if I didn't why would I have written it -- a nice philosophical point that I believe St Thomas might class as an Equivocation.  Nemmind.  I now press the Update Journal button.