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Good thing this World Wide Web can shelter a near infinite amount of stuff in its nodules, so it's no waste of space at all to post the ENTIRE following announcement of the event in Mass:

A Speculatively Spectacular Evening with:


Elizabeth Hand (Generation Loss)

John Crowley (Endless Things)

Paul Park (The White Tyger)

Flora Reed & Philip Price (of the Winterpills)

& a selection of interstitial material (i.e. in the breaks) from

Michael DeLuca, Jedediah Berry, Diana Gordon, &c.


Celebrate spring with Small Beer Press’s Speculatively Spectacular 
evening of art, readings, music, and perhaps a little more. Beginning 
at 7 p.m. on May 17,  the event will be held at Artifacts, a new 
gallery at 28 North Maple Street in Florence, MA. Artifacts is housed 
in a converted warehouse, where guests will be able to meet the 
authors, listen, dance if they are so inclined, and mingle as three 
bestselling authors showcase their latest offerings.
John Crowley (Endless Things), Elizabeth Hand (Generation Loss), and 
Paul Park (The White Tyger) will headline the event. Crowley, who 
lives in Conway and teaches at Yale, and Hand, who lives on the Maine 
coast, will be reading from their recently published novels (see next 
page for reviews). Park, who teaches at Williams College in 
Williamstown, Massachusetts, will read from his latest novel, The 
White Tyger.

A variety of other local authors will read their work, including a 
number of contributors to Small Beer Press’s tiny lit zine, LCRW.

The evening will be topped off by Flora Reed and Philip Price (of the 
critically-acclaimed Winterpills), who will provide musical 
entertainment.

Guests will be expected to peruse the art, be polite to the authors, 
provide good conversation, and, on leaving, remember where they 
parked their jetpacks.

Founded by Gavin J. Grant and Kelly Link and located in Northampton, 
MA, Small Beer Press is devoted to publishing the best in independent 
fabulist and speculative fiction.


###

Praise for Elizabeth Hand’s Generation Loss:
“Hand’s terse but transporting prose keeps the reader turning pages 
until Neary’s gritty charm does, finally, shine 
through.”                                —Entertainment Weekly

“Hand combines elements of the traditional amateur-sleuth mystery 
with a visceral story of personal redemption, and her pulsating prose 
smacks us in the face with frank, fascinating discussions of sex and 
drugs. . . . The utterly compelling protagonist, whose self-loathing 
competes with her hatred of life to see which can beat her into 
submission first, wins us over almost in spite of herself. 
Brilliantly written and completely original, Hand’s novel is an 
achievement with a capital A.”                   —Booklist (Starred 
Review)


Praise for John Crowley’s Endless Things:
“With Endless Things and the completion of the Ægypt cycle, Crowley 
has constructed one of the finest, most welcoming tales contemporary 
fiction has to offer us.”—Book Forum

“The perfect ending to a true master work which offers a densely 
detailed exploration of the connections between story and history, 
the fictions which inspire our imagination and the desires which 
inspire our visions of the future. At its heart, however, Endless 
Things is a love story about books and readers, and as such is a 
treasure trove for any reader who wishes to delve into the timeless 
mysteries of books and stories.”            —Green Man Review

When:  Thursday, May 17, 7 PM

Where:  Artifacts
28 North Maple Street
Florence, MA 01062
413-320-9480

Art:   Appropriately for Maine author Elizabeth Hand’s post-punk lit 
thriller Generation Loss, Artifacts will hold over the photographs 
from Susie J. Horgan’s Punk Love.

Music:   Flora Reed & Philip Price (of the critically-acclaimed 
Winterpills),

Refreshments:   Will be provided. As will seats, walls, windows, and 
doors.

Tickets:   This is not a ticketed event and entrance is free.

Books:  The authors’ books will be available on the night at a table 
manned by stalwart booksellers from Amherst Books.

Comments

chipbeckett
May. 14th, 2007 06:17 am (UTC)
Hope no one minds
Wow, I wish I could be there.

I hope no one minds if I share a story here.

Just last week I was wandering through my local independent bookstore and discovered Endless Things had been published, and I was elated and saddened at the same time. I stared at it and thought "A novel I've been reading for 20 years is coming to an end." There is that dread of all the best novels you read, that they will end.

But I found it so close to Mother's Day. And there is another tale. In 1981, my first year at the University of Iowa, I found a book in the basement of Iowa Book and Crook with a black cover and a scroll lettering that I would pick up again and again, because it looked really interesting. And then I read Thom Disch call it the "Perfect Fantasy Novel" and that sealed the deal. After three days of intense reading, I went and bought another copy for my mother and the next time I saw her, I gave it to her with the obligatory "you must read this." A few months later I saw her and she told me, "I was just going to read a few pages and then tell you it was okay, but it really was that good." From then on out I would call her whenever there was another Crowley novel and we would read and discuss avidly.

She died six years ago now, and has missed your rather prolific (at least for you) period. And I won't be able to share this end of a novel we loved with her.

If anyone there can give her a silent toast, I'd appreciate it. Her name was Mary and she was a great reader
crowleycrow
May. 14th, 2007 11:09 am (UTC)
Re: Hope no one minds
Well, I will, for one. Thanks for this story.

My first novel was sold not long after my father died, so he never knew that his ne'er-do-well son actually could acheive something (small). The idea that I wrote a novel so long in the making that someone who liked it would miss the ending hadn't occurrred to me: both affecting and discouraging.
proteon_nine
May. 16th, 2007 11:39 pm (UTC)
Re: Hope no one minds
It looks like I expect to attend. Buffaloed by the idea that I must either linger for extra hours at work or return the many miles plus I can't look back on this as something I wish I'd done. I'd be much glad to have you sign my favorite copy of Engine Summer (and also pick up Endless Things). Drive safe!